Krafty Lady Art Moulds for Polymer Clay

Krafty Lady Art MouldsVideo #465: Flexible silicone molds make it easy to pop out your piece with no distortion.

Topics Covered In This Video:

  • Linda Hanson, Sonita Arizona.
  • After Midnight Art Stamps… http://www.amstamps.com/
  • Unique blue colored silicone appearance.
  • Heat safe molds suitable for polymer clay, resin, Melt Art, UTEE, hot glue, plaster.
  • In mold baking of both liquid and solid polymer clay.
  • Detailed and intricate designs.
  • Non stick silicone, no need for mold release.
  • Using scrap piece of translucent clay to remove any lint or clay residue.
  • Warming up clay to soften it.
  • How to get your clay into all nooks and cranny’s of the mold.
  • Using clay blade to cut away excess clay from back.
  • Removing lips of clay that come over the edges of the mold.
  • Flexible silicon molds make it easy to pop out the piece without distortion.
  • Using molded polymer clay pieces for beads, scrapbooks, journal covers, home decor, sculptures, dolls, jewelry, etc. etc.


Question of the Day:

What are your favorite uses for using polymer clay molds and silicone molds? Leave your answers in the comment section below.

My goal is to help you to learn quicker and easier ways to bring up the professionalism in your polymer clay art.

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Looking forward to hearing from you!

Cindy Lietz SignaturePolymer Clay Tutor
  1. Anna Sabina, 19 December, 2013

    Gorgeous molds!!! The leaf mold looks really deep. Thanks for the tip on using soft clay. Love the journal cover. Hummm, I wonder if Cindy has an upcoming journal cover tut?

  2. Cindy Lietz, 19 December, 2013

    Hmmm I wonder?… :)

  3. Dorothy Hjermstad, 19 December, 2013

    Help! My oven spiked and in spite of putting a “tent” over my work, it did burn a little. This is to be a Christmas gift. Is it possible to remove the burn by sanding?

  4. Cindy Lietz, 19 December, 2013

    Hi Dorothy, sorry to hear that happened to you. :( Like on real skin, burns on polymer are usually more than skin deep and won’t come out with sanding. You could try and disguise the burn with an antiquing medium, acrylic paint, Gilder’s Paste or something along those lines. You may be surprised how cool it can end up looking.

    BTW there is lots of info on this blog that should help you with temp spikes in your oven. Just type Spiking or Baking into the search box at the top of the page and you should find help. Usually all it takes is lining your oven with tiles to keep the temp more even.

    Good luck! Let us know how it goes!

  5. Dorothy Hjermstad, 20 December, 2013

    Thank you so much for your reply!! I painted it with acrylic paint. I will send you a photo later.

  6. Den C, 19 December, 2013

    I notice you pay attention to the small details that make a creation go one step further to really shine and make it look like a masterpiece. Thank you for a those ideas.

  7. Hermine R, 19 December, 2013

    I like all info on molds. I never know what to do with them.Just don’t seem to have any affinity to them I love making them but the using is something else.
    Good to know that there are some that you can bake with the clay. Best way to get the fine details.

  8. Kristine Lockwood, 19 December, 2013

    Hi Cindy, What a fabulous video featuring our Krafty Lady Art Moulds. If I didn’t have them I would rush out and buy them. Ha Ha Ha. Many thanks again. Kristine the Krafty Lady in Melbourne, Australia

  9. Cindy Lietz, 21 December, 2013

    Hi Kristine, How nice to hear from you! Glad to hear you liked the video. It was a pleasure, since I really do love the molds that you guys make. Linda Hanson is a great lady, and I am happy to spread the word about her After Midnight Art Ranch and your excellent moulds she uses there. Let us know when you have new products you want us to share with our loyal and creative community!?

  10. Fran R, 20 December, 2013

    Was looking for just the right lock and key mold and found it at amstamps.com thanks to your video.

  11. Ann L, 20 December, 2013

    My favorite use of craft molds is making face shards, which can be used for so many different projects from jewelry to art dolls.

  12. Jill V., 20 December, 2013

    You had me at “You don’t need to sand these.” Seriously, what stunning results.

  13. Chris Crossland, 21 December, 2013

    Cindy! I Love using molds for pendants and embellishments to larger pieces. On the ones with all the tiny, fine extensions (like your crown mold) which can break when you unmold the piece, I find that putting the mold into the fridge about 10 minutes will make the clay firm enough to let you pop out all the beautiful detail without distortion or tearing. This works with even the finest details such as the ones intended for use with air-dry clay where the clay stays in the mold overnight. The same results can be obtained with raw polymer by “chilling out” for a few minutes! Thanks so much for your great tutorials…love them all.

  14. Dixie Ann, 21 December, 2013

    I have purchased several of these molds and they are one of the best I have ever used for getting great detail. I have my Kraft Lady list and as I purchase the ones needed, I cross it off my list. Thanks for the video Cindy, it reminded me I needed to order a couple more molds!

  15. Laurie Spar, 11 December, 2015

    Very helpful tutorial! Thanks. I picked up some hints and was able to correct what I was doing wrong! I’ve used some of these molds and they’re beautiful!

  16. Faith W, 20 February, 2016

    How do I make mold impressions deep enough to drill a hole (left to right). I make bracelets from chinaberry beads and have started incorporating a polymer charm into the design. My problem is, the molds don’t seem to be deep enough for me to drill a hole. Right now I’m limited to ovals and squares. I’d love to start using other designs but can’t figure out a way to beef up the image to drill a hole. I’ve looked at the AM Stamps designs and they don’t seem deep enough please help.

    p.s. Your video course #1 got me started. You’re a very good instructor. Thorough, organized, concise and clear (your Canadian accent is cool).

  17. Cindy Lietz, 22 February, 2016

    Thank you Faith for your kind comments! Looks like Dixie Ann did a great job in answering your question!

  18. Dixie Ann, 20 February, 2016

    Hi Faith, when I want to side drill a hole I usually add another layer of PC rolled out to the thickest setting on my pasta machine’. I pop the mold out and place it on this piece of clay and take my craft knife and cut around the design. I then take a round toothpick or something small and round to smooth out the edges. The 2 pieces will bond together when you bake them or you can add a thin layer of bake and bond, or polypaste between the layers if you prefer. To get a good even hole I use a bead rack pin and run it through the side first carefully twisting and turning it while eyeballing it through the mold. After I bake it, I use a small pin vise and drill out the hole for nothing thicker than 20 gauge wire, elastic or cord. If you don’t want that thick of a back piece, you can experiment with different thickness’es of clay you feel will work for you. Hope this helps.

  19. Faith W, 22 February, 2016

    Great! I wasn’t sure the two pieces would bond solid enough. Thank you for the info and responding so quickly!

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