Emberglow Crocosmia Palette | Premo Recipes Vol-052-B

Emberglow Crocosmia Color Palette by Polymer Clay Tutor1-B: Emberglow
2-B:
Crocosmia
3-B: Petal Pink
4-B: Hush

You know with the way our life has been going lately, with so many different projects on the go, my current gardening philosophy is… if it survives total neglect, then it gets to stay!

Now I do realize this attitude is a little harsh for a flower lover and former (and hopefully future) gardening enthusiast, but right now it is the way it has to be. There is no time for me to be in the garden right now. I am a little sad about it. But I do hope that I can get back to it again, before there isn’t a thing left but the weeds!

That being said, a few of the plants in my fend for yourself garden are doing OK, in spite of the lack of love and attention. One being the Crocosmia bulbs (or corms to be more precise).

If you have been here since the beginning, you may remember the Lucifer variety of Crocosmia used as inspiration for a previous color recipe palette. It is such a beautiful flowering specimen, even in its bud form. As you can see from the photo, this particular flower seems to be fine with the lack of watering, feeding and general nurturing, which means… it definitely gets to stay in my garden!

Emberglow Crocosmia Color Palette by Polymer Clay Tutor

Everyone who is subscribed to my Polymer Clay Guest List will be able to download the following recipes free, one per week on Friday mornings during the month of September 2012:

  • Emberglow (Recipe 052-1B)
  • Crocosmia (Recipe 052-2B)
  • Petal Pink (Recipe 052-3B)
  • Hush (Recipe 052-4B)


Emberglow
is an invigorating Yellow with the warm glow of burning embers, found on the stamens of the open Emberglow Crocosmia flower. Crocosmia is a bright and vibrant Orange so popular in today’s fashion trends… and also the dominant color of the inside of this blossom. Petal Pink is the Hot Pink inspired by the color found on the topside of the petals… a color so electric that you can’t help but feel alive when wearing it. And Hush is a rich lipstick Purple that streaks the outer petals and that could also be imagined onto the lips of someone whispering the word, “Hush.”

The recipes described above are from the Volume-052 B-Series Palette. They are free to download for everyone subscribed to my Polymer Clay Guest List, Friday Email Newsletter.

If you want to see the Volume-052 A-Series Color Palette that paid library members will also receive during the month of September, then click here: White Rock Beach Color Palette

Cindy, you’re such an artist in so many ways. I enjoy reading your stories as much as I enjoy the video tutorials. You create such delightful imagery with your words and beautiful, even ingenious creations with polymer. ~Michelle-A

You paint such a beautiful picture Cindy… Love the color names too! ~Cherie-B

I confess to only recently beginning to use my own colour mixes. I just was never brave enough before… your mixes make life even more easy… and less stressful… and now I feel even braver. ~Julz-M

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If you would like more information about the Members Library, here are some direct links:

Library Member Benefits and What Others Are Saying
Order Page for Color Recipe and Video Back Issue Packages
Become A Full Member at the Library

Cindy Lietz SignaturePolymer Clay Tutor
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Comments

  1. “Only the strong will survive” This was my brothers comment when his house was engulfed in flames in one of the worse bushfires in the state of Victoria Australia.

    Now many years later he remembers going back to the ashes of his home a few weeks after the fire. Tiny green shoots were poking through the blackened earth. He even loved the weeds that were appearing. So although weeds are unwanted in our gardens they all have a purpose, (not sure what) but it certainly made him happy to see them.

    I have never seen Crocosmia corms for sale here in the UK but will look out for them in the autumn (fall) as these are just the type of plants I need for my wilderness garden.

    The colours are just stunning so a big thank you CINDY I will really enjoy mixing up this pallete and do not be concerned about letting your garden have it’s own way for a few months it is quite a freeing experience…………………..cheers…… xx…………………………………….

    • Hi Elaine

      Crocosmia were known until recently here in the UK as Montbretia. They’ve always grown in my garden and always provide a colourful patch even when the weather ruins other plants (as here in the UK this summer) They can be a bit invasive so they need a bit of discipline … but they’re always reliable, always provide plenty of flowers, I love them.

      … and Cindy, what a very vibrant colour palette, gorgeous …. as are all your palettes!

      • Lesley S,
        Thanks so much for the heads-up, when you mentioned that they were known as Montbretia I remember my Grandma grew them round her outside Loo, when I was a small child but I only thought they came in orange.

        I know they are tough little plants as do not ever remember them getting a lick of water (as my grans place had no running water, we had to walk half a mile with two milk churns to collect it)

        Thanks again for the info, I will certainly look to get some now I know they come in such beautiful colours.

        Yep CINDY I agree that these would make for an interesting tute, the buds would look spectacular hanging on a multicoloured, mulistrand piece of jewellery.

  2. Lovely color palette and the flower is beautiful too! Although I have never heard of this flower either, I did go back and sneak a peak at the flower in its bud stage. Wow Cindy, wish you could come up with a tutorial for this flower in a minature size with both it’s bud stage and fully opened. I see a lot of potential here for a gorgeous pair of bud earrings and a flower and bud necklace. Would this be a possibility? hint, hint……

  3. Thanks Cindy, another new lovely plant, googled Crocosmia, and wow, the images of it growing are amazing. What a border you could do. Only hardy to 10 degrees farenheit, unfortunately. If anyone grows it successfully in zone 6, please share your secrets.

    Also just want to add my voice to the others to request future tutes on that dragonfly, the interchangible watch bracelet, the great mix of bracelets with charms, and a wish for a tutorial on both the buds and full flower Crocosmia.

  4. Never heard of this plant! Isn’t it beautiful and colorful ! What fun this color palette will be . Just love the colors.

    Yep, since the back surgery, my flowers are neglected ! If the afternoon rains keep up, I’m O.K. If not, have to water them. So far,so good. The Lantana, Moss rose, and wandering jew are doing just fine. But plants I put in for a dry summer, aren’t doing to well. Too much rain. Oh, well, if they die, I’ll replace with hardier stuff. If they are colorful they are welcome……………….

  5. These colors are just spectacular and mouth-watering! Can’t wait to see how Cindy makes them! Don’t you all think that Cindy possesses some kind of magic to come up with perfect palettes week after week? I do!

  6. Hi, Cindy!

    I wonder if you could help me with this. A client asked me to do a polymer sculpture for her fish tank. I’m quite excited about it. I would only do it in polymer—no glue, paint, etc.. My only reservation is if this would hurt the fish in any way. It is plastic and I can’t imagine a danger but of course I would not want to hurt the little ones. Thanks for your attention!

    Andrea

    • Hi Andrea, that is a question I have no idea on. As far as the clay being in the water, that should be fine, but I don’t know whether or not it would harm the fish in any way. It would be a good question to ask an aquarium shop… and/or the clay manufacturer. Do come back to this thread to post what you find out so that the info will be posted here for others to reference if needed. ~Cindy

    • Andrea, I sure wouldn’t chance it. Fish are among the most sensitive of pets, and they will constantly be surrounded by the water that contains whatever you put into it. If I were you, I’d make a sculpture that could sit behind the tank and be visible from the front. That way, there would be no chance of harming the fish or the sculpture – it wouldn’t develop a film or break down. :-)

      • Thank you, Kay and Cindy. I will do my research. Kay, your idea is a very good one to consider especially since I’ve never owned a tank and it is apparent you have experience. I will get back to you on this.

        • Andrea, I called and left a message to speak with someone at Polyform about the issue, no response yet. In case you want to try yourself:

          847-427-0200

          Our postal address is:
          Polyform Products Company
          1901 Estes Avenue
          Elk Grove Village, IL 60007-5415

          We can also be reached at:
          http://www.polyformproducts.com

  7. Hi Andrea,
    About polymer clay in fish tanks. I do not think there HAS been much research but some natural rocks can alter the quality of the fish tank water. My DH who ran an Aquatic shop for fifteen years said he used to do the vinegar test. Drop an amount of vinegar onto the object, if it fizzes DO NOT use it. Sculptures made of cement are killers to fish. These creatures cannot escape from the confines of their tank (unlike if they were swimming in their natural environment ie: rivers, the ocean etc
    .
    Although I would assume that baked PC with no coating would be inert I personally would not risk it. My DH suggests at least a months trial and a weekly test with a good quality water testing kit that shows the pH – KH – GH – No2 and NO3 + CI2. there is a six in one water quality test kit made by TETRA a trusted name in the aquatic world
    When he ran his business he was known as the Fish Doctor and was always sad when ignorant people killed or harmed their fish by thoughtless actions. He saved many of them but it took sometimes weeks of care and attention and was often known to refuse to sell a certain species if the customer didn’t understand or have the proper equipment to care for these creatures. When you know that the common gold fish can have a natural life span of 30 to 40 years, you will understand that he used to get so mad ( I had to take him up to the local pub for a drink and to calm down)
    But like CINDY says, always test anything and everthing, it is not worth the risk of selling anything that you yourself are not sure of. Now off my soapbox……………..cheers xx…………………………………

    • Elaine, thanks so much for your thoughtful comments! I didn’t know the possible lifespan of goldfish could be so long. It just shows how hard it is to keep captive fish alive in unnatural environment. Re polymer clay, I’m thinking, more than ever, that the plasticizers and other chemicals must remain in some form, and not be wholly driven off in the oven. I know they’ve changed plasticizers recently in most clay formulations because of the European rules, but they must be using something similar. Your husband is such a good person for trying to make sure the fish he sold went to good environments. Thanks for your comment, too, Andrea. Best wishes to you all, and to Cindy and Doug for hosting this great forum. Kay

    • I love that you got on the “soapbox” in defence of our scaled friends, Elaine. I love to bend the ear of all who will listen when it comes to ethically caring for our pets. I don’t personally keep fish as pets, but one of my sons tried to keep an aquarium whilst in high school. Unfortunately, the local shop was not staffed by anyone as caring and knowledgeable as your hubby, and he had to give up the aquarium. Books can only take you so far: having an expert with the right attitude, as opposed to uninterested and poorly trained staff, who only wanted to keep selling him replacements, would have encouraged my son to delve further into this fascinating world.

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